All posts tagged: TASCHEN

Modernism Rediscovered: Julius Shulman

TASCHEN’s Modernism Rediscovered brought to light for the first time some 300 forgotten architectural masterpieces, drawn from photographer Julius Shulman’s personal archives. Paying tribute to houses and buildings that had slipped from public view, Shulman’s stunning photographs uncovered a rarely seen side of California Modernism. This extensive volume brings hundreds more architectural gems into the spotlight. The photographs, most of which are published here for the first time in a book, depict buildings by Albert Frey, Louis Kahn, John Lautner, Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Richard Neutra, and more, as well as the work of many lesser known architects. Not just restricted to the West Coast this time, the images were taken all across the United States as well as in Mexico, Israel, and Hong Kong. Widely considered the greatest architectural photographer of our time, Julius Shulman has once again opened his archives so that we may rediscover the world’s hidden Modernist treasures. The buildings burned in our memories, which to us represent the spirit of the fifties and sixties architectural design, were …

Richard Meier

If it is true that Ludwig Mies van der Rohe once said, “God is in the details,” it might be possible to say of Richard Meier’s architecture that God is in the numbers. More than any other contemporary architect, Meier has imposed a style that is almost invariably driven by grids and precisely calculated proportions. Nor are these arithmetical elements the only predictable components of his designs. And yet his work is far from being as sterile as its rigorous white demeanor might imply. Rarely completely open, Meier’s buildings are usually a symphonic arrangement of geometric volumes composed of solids, voids, and generous glazing alternating with closed surfaces. Closed on the entry side, open to the ocean or the landscape, separating private and public spaces, double height and more where the design allows, or rather imposes, Meier’s houses announce but do not summarize his approach to larger buildings. Smooth glazed or white enameled panels alternate, too, with louvered, articulated façades, not according to the architect’s whim, but rather in function to the program and the …

Book Review: Piano. Complete Works 1966–2014

Piano, virtuoso. This book covers the wide-ranging career of the master architect. “The array of buildings by Renzo Piano is staggering in scope and comprehensive in the diversity of scale, material, and form. He is truly an architect whose sensibilities represent the widest range of this and earlier centuries.” Such was the description of Renzo Piano given by the Pritzker Prize jury as they bestowed the prestigious award on him in 1998. Whereas some architects have a signature style, what sets Piano apart is that he seeks simply to apply a coherent set of ideas to new projects in extraordinarily different ways. “One of the great beauties of architecture is that each time, it is like life starting all over again,” Piano says. “Like a movie director doing a love story, a western, or a murder mystery, a new world confronts an architect with each project.” This explains why it takes more than a superficial glance to recognize Piano’s fingerprints on such varied projects as the Pompidou Center in Paris (1971-77), the Kansai airport in …

Book Review: ANDO Complete Works 1975-2014

The new issue of TASCHEN’s monograph on Japanese architect Tadao Ando is an impressive voyage through the world of one of the most popular architects of our time. In a volume as heavy as the concrete slabs used in Ando’s buildings, the book cements the self-taught architect as one of the world’s most influential builders. As an introduction to Tadao Ando’s massive work, the book begins with a series of chapters explaining his personal background, key projects and sources of inspiration. But for the main part, the architecture is let to speak for itself through drawings, sketches and most importantly, scenic photographs. It is a welcome surprise for the truly interested reader, however, to find so many small drawings of Ando’s buildings, allowing a deeper understanding of the architecture than pictures alone would do. The journey starts in the sphere of the private home with a couple of early creations: The legendary Rowhouse in Sumiyoshi, Kidosaki House and Koshino House, all built in Japan. We move on to the architecture of Ando’s own studio, and …

Book Review: 100 Contemporary Architects

Architecture at the dawn of the 21st century: the indispensable compendium This two-volume compilation brings together highlights from TASCHEN’s groundbreaking title Building a New Millennium and the first four volumes of our renowned Architecture Now! books for a comprehensive study of architecture around the world at the beginning of the 21st century. Up-and-coming architects-tomorrow’s superstars-are featured alongside the field’s most respected practitioners, such as Santiago Calatrava, Herzog & de Meuron, Koolhaas/OMA, Daniel Libeskind, Richard Meier, Oscar Niemeyer, and Jean Nouvel. More details can be found here: http://www.taschen.com/pages/en/catalogue/architecture/all/44408/facts.100_contemporary_architects.htm ISBN-978-3836500913