All posts tagged: Phaidon

Renzo Piano Building Workshop: Complete Works Volume 5

It’s 23 years since the first of Peter Buchanan’s monumental volumes on Renzo Piano appeared. The latest edition features projects completed between 2000 and 2007, plus several that are recently realised, including the London Bridge Tower (‘The Shard’). In total, the books record more than 30 years of achievement since Piano and his then partner Richard Rogers achieved instant superstar status with the completion of Paris’ Pompidou Centre in 1977. It is hard to think of any project in the intervening years that has failed to meet the expectations of Piano’s multitude of admirers. He is the archetypal architect’s architect, a pioneer who leads where others follow–for example, in the virtuoso use of materials such as timber, stone, brick and glass. Among the 14 projects recorded here (in meticulous detail, in tune with the expansive tone of the Phaidon series) are the New York Times office tower, Rome’s Auditorium Parco della Musica, the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas and the Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church. Also included are the final phases of the Lingotto Factory Conversion …

MIES by Detlef Mertins

Spanning sixty years, two continents and two world wars, based first in Berlin and then in Chicago, Mies van der Rohe’s career was a complex one, marked by discontinuities and struggles as much as continuities and success. Little wonder then that Phaidon’s new book, Mies – pretty much consumed the final decade of its author, curator architect and writer, Detlef Mertins. Mertins read everything written by and on Mies van der Rohe, travelled to all of his buildings and conducted an incredibly detailed study of the architectural, philosophical and scientific literature in Mies’ own libary. To describe the book that sprang from all this research as merely ‘exhaustive’ is to bring new meaning to the word understatement. Farnsworth House, Plano, Ilinois, (1945-51) – Mies van der Rohe As Mertins writes, in retrospect the trajectory of Mies van der Rohe’s career was less inexorable and more contingent upon changing contexts, challenges, clients and collaborators. While there are certainly continuities between them, how different the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois (1945–50) is from the Barcelona Pavilion (1928–9), and …

Daniel Ost by Paul Geerts

Daniel Ost works with flowers, branches, vegetation and plants to create large-scale natural installations, site-specific sculptures and floral decorations. His work bridges the gap between floral design and art. Daniel Ost, published by Phaidon in October, is the first comprehensive monograph to showcase the work of the world’s most renowned floral artist. The book includes 80 projects, located around the world from royal residencies to rooftop gardens, and ranging from his early experimental work to sculptures that redefine the boundaries of art, design and floral arrangement. Ost fuses Eastern minimalism with Baroque style and influences from Flemish painting. Among his global projects are works for Dries Van Noten, the Venice Biennale, the Museum of Islamic Art in Qatar, and the Izumo Shrine and Toji Temple in Japan. Ost’s early work is reminiscent of land art, using anything found in nature – seeds and bark, vegetables and moss to create site-specific interventions, transforming a beach into a surreal gallery space with igloos of sand and delicately placed vegetation. Later projects include a gigantic installation for a …