All posts tagged: Modernism

THE NIGHT THAT CHANGED THE COURSE OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN INDIA

Modern India. Post-Independent India went through a lot of turmoil, it was like the day after an Indian Wedding, the guests are gone but the ‘memories’ of their stay remains along with the mess, you don’t know which stuff is yours and what to throw out, every corner of the house throwing up a treasure chest.

Modernism Rediscovered: Julius Shulman

TASCHEN’s Modernism Rediscovered brought to light for the first time some 300 forgotten architectural masterpieces, drawn from photographer Julius Shulman’s personal archives. Paying tribute to houses and buildings that had slipped from public view, Shulman’s stunning photographs uncovered a rarely seen side of California Modernism. This extensive volume brings hundreds more architectural gems into the spotlight. The photographs, most of which are published here for the first time in a book, depict buildings by Albert Frey, Louis Kahn, John Lautner, Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Richard Neutra, and more, as well as the work of many lesser known architects. Not just restricted to the West Coast this time, the images were taken all across the United States as well as in Mexico, Israel, and Hong Kong. Widely considered the greatest architectural photographer of our time, Julius Shulman has once again opened his archives so that we may rediscover the world’s hidden Modernist treasures. The buildings burned in our memories, which to us represent the spirit of the fifties and sixties architectural design, were …

Brion Cemetery Meditation Pavilion – Carlo Scarpa

Carlo Scarpa was one of the second generation of Modern architects – however, as a son of Venice, he was sensitive to that city’s old-fashioned culture (unlike most modernists), and made his reputation through a number of commissions and renovations in which he used Modern methods and spatial concepts to transform Venice, rather than crudely eliminate its ancient identity. He understood that the past is not dead and that we in the present must engage and intertwine with it. Scarpa did not restrict himself to Venice, however. Indeed, perhaps his most visited and well-known work was the last he completed in his lifetime – the Brion Cemetery at San Vito D’Altivole, a small village not far from the Dolomite Mountains. This was the country of Giuseppe Brion, founder of the prestigious Brionvega electronics company, who Scarpa admired as a man of the people, who had “started from the bottom”, as well as for the design quality of his products, many of which are museum pieces today. When Brion died in 1968, his family bought a …

Le Corbusier: Acrobat of Architecture – B. V. Doshi

Today, we mark the 50 years since Le Corbusier died while swimming towards the Sun! It’s amazing how one man changes the world with his art, architecture and powerful idea. He is possibly the greatest architect of all times and expanded the notion of want it actually is to be an architect – a poet and a harmonizer who showed the way to the Modern Age of solidarity. The following is an interview from Vistāra – The Architecture of India, Catalogue of the Exhibition, edited by Carmen Kagal, 204-214. The Festival of India, 1986. Doshi, Balkrishna. “Le Corbusier: Acrobat of Architecture – B. V. Doshi interviewed by Carmen Kagal.” A youthful Doshi (in black coat) on site with Le Corbusier. Q. So much has been written about Le Corbusier that I think we can dispense with the basics. We know, of course, that he was a many-sided man – architect, painter, sculptor, poet, author – or rather polemicist. However, if you had to choose the one outstanding quality of his personality, what would it be? A. …

Chandigarh Redux

Sixty years on, Werner Feiersinger’s CHANDIGARH REDUX constitutes a new chapter in the narrative. This collection of his photographs – in which he looks at the city’s architecture with the keen eye of a sculptor – casts the work of Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, Jane B. Drew, and E. Maxwell Fry in a new light. Werner Feiersinger captures the architecture’s solid, sculptural qualities, as well as Chandigarh’s vivid atmosphere and virtuosity. By Andreas Vass Chandigarh was the invention of a small group of technicians and administrative officers in Prime Minister Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru’s inner circle in the administration oft he East Punjab. The hesitant skeptical, factious, notoriously penniless and oft-changing leadership oft he new Indian state, which emerged from the partition immediately following the liberation of India in 1947, had come to this decision entirely on its own. Nehru and the planning staff headed by P.N. Thapar und P.L. Varma selected a handful of American and European architects and urban planners to design the city. The implementation and development of Chandigarh has been the achievement of Indian engineers, …

Josep Lluis Sert: Father of Urban Design and Peabody Terrace Complex

Josep Lluis Sert: Father of Urban Design and Peabody Terrace Complex “I’ve always been interested in architecture as an extension not only of technical problems, but also of human problems. That aspect interests me very much: how that represents a way of life and a vital gesture. I am probably more interested in a less abstract expression of architecture than some of my colleagues.” —Josep Lluis Sert Biography: Born in Barcelona, Josep Lluis Sert showed keen interest in the works of his uncle, the painter Josep Maria Sert, and of Gaudí. He studied architecture at the Escola Superior d’Arquitectura in Barcelona and set up his own studio in 1929. That same year he moved to Paris, in response to an invitation from Le Corbusier to work for him (without payment). Returning to Barcelona in 1930, he continued his practice there until 1937. During the 1930s, he co-founded the group GATCPAC (Grup d’Artistes i Tècnics Catalans per al Progrés de l’Arquitectura Contemporània, i.e. Group of Catalan Artists and Technicians for the Progress of Contemporary Architecture), which later …