All posts tagged: laurence king

Archi-Graphic

Are you a trivia whiz who knows his Alto from his Ando? Which bespectacled architect set the trend, nay stereotype, for round eyewear across the profession? Whose eyebrows are on fleek? The Distinguishing Features Game, is one of more than 60 infographics featured in Archi-Graphic, a book from publisher Laurence King. Author Frank Jacobus, an associate professor at the Fay Jones School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas, dreamed it up as part of his goal to bring data visualization to his field—along with a much-needed dose of levity. “I love the humor in the book and that’s part of what we’re after,” Jacobus says. “There’s a tendency to take things too seriously in architecture. We’re trying to make things a bit lighter. Part of my interest is in data visualization and I thought, what a great way to bring architecture to a bigger audience.” Jacobus sketched out all of the infographics and worked with a group of about 20 architecture students to research and digitize them. The whole process took about a year and …

Architecture Visionaries

The book Architecture Visionaries revolves around biography and projects fo 75 noted architects of 20th century. The biographies start with Antonio Gaudi and ends with Shigeru Ban. Arranged in a broadly chronological order, the book gives the reader a sense of the impact that creative individuals have had on the advancement of architecture and our built environment. Important dates in the architects’ careers are established in timeline features, allowing the author liberty to move beyond well-known biographies to analyze the buildings and map out the astonishing insights behind them. With insightful passage describing thoughtfully selected sample, this is a compelling and unique lead to the architects whose idea have created the buildings around us. A very valuable addition to every architecture buff’s library. Image Courtesy: © Laurence King Publishing Ltd

A History of Western Architecture

Properly covering the history of architecture in any single volume is a big challenge, but David Watkin successfully covers thousands of years with about 700 pages in his book, A History of Western Architecture. The book begins the journey with early Mesopotamian Temples from 3600BC and then travels through all the major architectural movements, including Classical, Byzantine, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Modernism, and the rest of the 20th Century. As the title suggests, the book focuses on the western part of the world – Europe, Scandinavia, and North America are the main focus of the text. The book provides a very good history of architecture and combines easy to understand prose with excellent images of the structures. The fifth edition of the book covers all relevant western architecture up to the mid-2000s. The work from the 2000s is fairly thin, but this is understandable given that these buildings are too new for their relevance in history to be fully understood. The pages are full of high-quality images of the buildings being discussed. Almost every page has …

Architectural Styles: Owen Hopkins

In the introduction to his visual guide to Architectural Styles, Owen Hopkins lets the reader know that architectural “style” is a 19th century creation, something that enabled architectural historians to chart developments in the appearances of buildings over time. But 220 pages later, in the book’s postscript, he asks, “In the face of ever-increasing architectural variety…what possibilities are there for ‘style’?” In both instances, Hopkins appears to be arguing against the validity of architectural style and the need for a book documenting one. Yet alas, he has written a book on such a topic, and with its focus on the visual, the book is a good introduction for students of architecture and laypeople with an interest in architecture, and a handy reference for architects who have forgotten what they learned in their history classes. In the book’s chronological format, there is an obvious move from simplicity to complexity, from “one” classical style to a plethora of styles, or, more accurately, a plurality of architects creating their own styles. The book starts with a chapter on …