All posts tagged: Design

Brion Cemetery Meditation Pavilion – Carlo Scarpa

Carlo Scarpa was one of the second generation of Modern architects – however, as a son of Venice, he was sensitive to that city’s old-fashioned culture (unlike most modernists), and made his reputation through a number of commissions and renovations in which he used Modern methods and spatial concepts to transform Venice, rather than crudely eliminate its ancient identity. He understood that the past is not dead and that we in the present must engage and intertwine with it. Scarpa did not restrict himself to Venice, however. Indeed, perhaps his most visited and well-known work was the last he completed in his lifetime – the Brion Cemetery at San Vito D’Altivole, a small village not far from the Dolomite Mountains. This was the country of Giuseppe Brion, founder of the prestigious Brionvega electronics company, who Scarpa admired as a man of the people, who had “started from the bottom”, as well as for the design quality of his products, many of which are museum pieces today. When Brion died in 1968, his family bought a …

10 Stories Of Collective Housing: Graphical Analysis Of Inspiring Masterpieces

In the first line I have to mention that this book researched by a+t opens up a new horizon for understanding the housing perspective. I have hardly come across a book so well illustrated, analysed and more over interestingly presented. Ten collective housing has been discussed in ten separate chapters while bringing in necessary references and similar ideas from around the world. This is a must have for every scholar of architecture as well as practitioners and faculty members. The introduction of each architect (even responsible for little known or little documented projects) in a separate way makes a completely useful guide and abolishes the need to look it up at the library or internet further. This well documented publication has the capability of doing away with the need for further references at one pass. Learn more here: http://aplust.net/tienda/libros/%20%20%20%20%20/10%20Stories%20of%20Collective%20Housing/busqueda/10%20stories/ Graphics Credits:  a+t reseach group

Compositions in Architecture by Dan Hanlon

Compositions in Architecture provides students and educators a unique opportunity to grasp architectural problems and create exclusive solutions. The book is intertwined with architectural design process as well as necessary theory but not overburdening creative nascent minds. Author Dan Hanlon explains architectural compositions through lucid diagrams and elucidate concepts which are rooted in different cultures and traditional beliefs. The interesting point here to be noted is that the author doesn’t simply illustrate the problem with only one kind of example but he brings back compositions from different cultures to solve a problem and thereby making it a very unique method to see what options different civilizations and some brilliant minds of their time has tried upon. The book focuses on vernacular traditions as well as doesn’t compromise to elucidate the designs of most contemporary architects of our age which makes it very special. It will surely go a great length in kindling interest in architecture to this young generation. More details can be found here: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-047005364X.html Photo Courtesy: Wiley

‘SPACES’ by Material Immaterial studio

Design studio’s descripton: ‘ Space is the breadth of art ‘                                                             – Frank Lloyd Wright Space constantly encompasses our being like an inherently formless vapour. Its visual form, its dimensions and scale, the quality of its light, all of these elements deepen our perception of the spatial boundaries defined by elements of form. As space begins to be captured, enclosed, moulded, and organised by the elements of mass and volume, architecture comes into being. Many of the best and most influential buildings of the last century are constructed with concrete, from Le-Corbusier’s quintessentially modernist Villa Savoye, to Frank Lloyd Wright’s spellbinding Falling water, and from Oscar Niemeyer’s nation defining Brasilia, to Tadao Ando’s exhilarating Church of the Light. We at the ‘Material Immaterial studio’ have conceived these miniature concrete pieces that we fondly call “SPACES” to advocate and celebrate concrete’s beauty efficacy and its incalculable contribution to creating and defining spaces in the modern life. Each piece is an individually complete space defined by Volumes and voids that give the human imagination a glimpse …

Josep Lluis Sert: Father of Urban Design and Peabody Terrace Complex

Josep Lluis Sert: Father of Urban Design and Peabody Terrace Complex “I’ve always been interested in architecture as an extension not only of technical problems, but also of human problems. That aspect interests me very much: how that represents a way of life and a vital gesture. I am probably more interested in a less abstract expression of architecture than some of my colleagues.” —Josep Lluis Sert Biography: Born in Barcelona, Josep Lluis Sert showed keen interest in the works of his uncle, the painter Josep Maria Sert, and of Gaudí. He studied architecture at the Escola Superior d’Arquitectura in Barcelona and set up his own studio in 1929. That same year he moved to Paris, in response to an invitation from Le Corbusier to work for him (without payment). Returning to Barcelona in 1930, he continued his practice there until 1937. During the 1930s, he co-founded the group GATCPAC (Grup d’Artistes i Tècnics Catalans per al Progrés de l’Arquitectura Contemporània, i.e. Group of Catalan Artists and Technicians for the Progress of Contemporary Architecture), which later …

David Adjaye – Form, Heft, Material

This is an elegant catalog of David Adjaye’s work. Although the format is straightforward, renderings are tastefully personalized, photos are poetic, and essays are interesting. But I do hope that the talented young architect can have a better and more comprehensive monographs of his work to date, other than just a modest display of teasing vignettes. For those looking for a drawing or photo book, I warn you, has a lot more depth and a large amount of texts that document the process, ideas, his projects and social vision. A must see to understand what has happened in the world of architecture today. Chapters alternate between the essays—by curators, architects, and writers—and the project portfolios. At times, the transition from the exhibition overview to the rest of the text seems rushed, and readers may be perplexed by images that are small or appear out of sync. Yet the promise of the book’s cover—a pattern taken from the cladding of Adjaye’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC)—is delivered in over 175 color photographs …

Book Review: Piano. Complete Works 1966–2014

Piano, virtuoso. This book covers the wide-ranging career of the master architect. “The array of buildings by Renzo Piano is staggering in scope and comprehensive in the diversity of scale, material, and form. He is truly an architect whose sensibilities represent the widest range of this and earlier centuries.” Such was the description of Renzo Piano given by the Pritzker Prize jury as they bestowed the prestigious award on him in 1998. Whereas some architects have a signature style, what sets Piano apart is that he seeks simply to apply a coherent set of ideas to new projects in extraordinarily different ways. “One of the great beauties of architecture is that each time, it is like life starting all over again,” Piano says. “Like a movie director doing a love story, a western, or a murder mystery, a new world confronts an architect with each project.” This explains why it takes more than a superficial glance to recognize Piano’s fingerprints on such varied projects as the Pompidou Center in Paris (1971-77), the Kansai airport in …

Book Review: ANDO Complete Works 1975-2014

The new issue of TASCHEN’s monograph on Japanese architect Tadao Ando is an impressive voyage through the world of one of the most popular architects of our time. In a volume as heavy as the concrete slabs used in Ando’s buildings, the book cements the self-taught architect as one of the world’s most influential builders. As an introduction to Tadao Ando’s massive work, the book begins with a series of chapters explaining his personal background, key projects and sources of inspiration. But for the main part, the architecture is let to speak for itself through drawings, sketches and most importantly, scenic photographs. It is a welcome surprise for the truly interested reader, however, to find so many small drawings of Ando’s buildings, allowing a deeper understanding of the architecture than pictures alone would do. The journey starts in the sphere of the private home with a couple of early creations: The legendary Rowhouse in Sumiyoshi, Kidosaki House and Koshino House, all built in Japan. We move on to the architecture of Ando’s own studio, and …

Book Review: Designing Architecture: The Elements of Process

Designing Architecture by Andrew Pressman is an essential guide throughout the design process to every person involved in design and design related field.How to brainstorm, how to come out with all these ideas and while doing these works how to enjoy yourself. A thoroughly guided and blissfully written, anybody going through it will feel the urge to start a design anew,such is the charisma of the writing. Brief summation after each chapter makes the book more user-friendly and practical. The book tells you a story.The story of design.I would request everyone to go through that story,live up to the joy of design once again and while doing so, not to forget to enjoy the Process. More details can be found hee: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415595162/ ISBN-978-0-415-59515-5