All posts tagged: art

Carlo Scarpa

In Robert McCarter’s Carlo Scarpa monograph, Austrian architect Peter Noever tells an astonishing tale. In 1974, he and Scarpa toured the Adolf Loos made American Bar in Vienna. The moment they entered Scarpa started evaluating the space. He ordered champagne for the ladies…… who were present and a measuring tape for himself. Scarpa then continued to measure everything down to the exact millimeter. When completed he announced the space to be of “singular spiritual and emotional quality.” This is precisely how I envision McCarter analyze the work of the Venetian architect Carlo Scarpa—measuring tape in hand.  In this substantial volume, McCarter leads us by the hand through Scarpa’s achievements. He gives us a survey that is both vast, and in the spirit of Scarpa, meticulously detailed. Carlo Scarpa is a mystery. He has never achieved the iconic status in this country reserved for Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, or Louis Kahn, yet Scarpa was revered by all of them. McCarter’s comprehensive tome has the capacity to change this. With over 350 drawings, photos and plans …

Notes on quality in Architecture

This following write up is from the Blog of Conrad Newel: http://famousarchitect.blogspot.in/2012/05/84you-dont-have-to-be-good-part-3-its.html Looking over the previous two post in this series – Mountain Dwellings and the New Museum – I was contemplating on the idea of quality (…or lack of it ) as seen in these two famous works: Lack of quality detailing and construction in the Mountain Dwellings and lack of spatial quality in the New Museum. So then I remembered this statement by Mies.  First of all, I was influenced by old buildings. I looked at them, people built them. I don’t know the names, and I don’t know what it was . . . mostly very simple buildings. When I was really young, not even twenty years old, I was impressed by the strength of these old buildings because they didn’t even belong to any epoch. But they were there for one thousand years and still there and still impressive, and nothing could change it. And all the styles, the great styles, passed, but they were still there. They didn’t lose anything. They …

THE BUILDINGS THAT REVOLUTIONIZED ARCHITECTURE by Isabel Kuhl & Florian Heine

THE BUILDINGS THAT REVOLUTIONIZED ARCHITECTURE by Isabel Kuhl & Florian Heine is a great source book which showcases 100 buildings around the world. It ranges from Taj Mahal of India to Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, from Brunelleschi’s Ospedale Degli Innocenti in Florence, to Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion. Fitting to this chronological order, 100th building is David Child’s One World Trade Centre. With full bleed great pictures and sharp story that surround each architectural marvel this book will go a great length space to arrive at any reader curious about architecture. This record is not just intended for architecture students or professionals, but general readers also will be equally attracted to the marvels of this book. Glamourous photographs of each building are featured in full bleed spreads, which also contain brief texts offering fascinating histories and contextual information, as well as biographies of the architects. The book also includes a glossary at the back of the book that elucidates vital terms, a must for any non-architect readers. A priceless overview to the world of …

‘SPACES’ by Material Immaterial studio

Design studio’s descripton: ‘ Space is the breadth of art ‘                                                             – Frank Lloyd Wright Space constantly encompasses our being like an inherently formless vapour. Its visual form, its dimensions and scale, the quality of its light, all of these elements deepen our perception of the spatial boundaries defined by elements of form. As space begins to be captured, enclosed, moulded, and organised by the elements of mass and volume, architecture comes into being. Many of the best and most influential buildings of the last century are constructed with concrete, from Le-Corbusier’s quintessentially modernist Villa Savoye, to Frank Lloyd Wright’s spellbinding Falling water, and from Oscar Niemeyer’s nation defining Brasilia, to Tadao Ando’s exhilarating Church of the Light. We at the ‘Material Immaterial studio’ have conceived these miniature concrete pieces that we fondly call “SPACES” to advocate and celebrate concrete’s beauty efficacy and its incalculable contribution to creating and defining spaces in the modern life. Each piece is an individually complete space defined by Volumes and voids that give the human imagination a glimpse …

Josep Lluis Sert: Father of Urban Design and Peabody Terrace Complex

Josep Lluis Sert: Father of Urban Design and Peabody Terrace Complex “I’ve always been interested in architecture as an extension not only of technical problems, but also of human problems. That aspect interests me very much: how that represents a way of life and a vital gesture. I am probably more interested in a less abstract expression of architecture than some of my colleagues.” —Josep Lluis Sert Biography: Born in Barcelona, Josep Lluis Sert showed keen interest in the works of his uncle, the painter Josep Maria Sert, and of Gaudí. He studied architecture at the Escola Superior d’Arquitectura in Barcelona and set up his own studio in 1929. That same year he moved to Paris, in response to an invitation from Le Corbusier to work for him (without payment). Returning to Barcelona in 1930, he continued his practice there until 1937. During the 1930s, he co-founded the group GATCPAC (Grup d’Artistes i Tècnics Catalans per al Progrés de l’Arquitectura Contemporània, i.e. Group of Catalan Artists and Technicians for the Progress of Contemporary Architecture), which later …