Month: August 2015

Space Block Hanoi by Kazuhiro Kojima

Space Block Hanoi by Kazuhiro Kojima This is an experimental housing complex that sought to regenerate the shops-cum-houses in an old area of Hanoi, Vietnam. This district, popularly known as “the 36th street district”, is composed primarily of houses inhabited by traditionally large Chinese families. The buildings have narrow frontages and an unusually extended depth of 70-80 m. These high-density, low-rise buildings were considered to be a comfortable domestic environment until the changes of government in Vietnam during the 20th century. Han,” became such a high-density city (1,000 people per hectare} that many families began to live together within one unit and even to transform courtyards into actual rooms. As a result the standard of living deteriorated. The porosity of space: where the breeze comes through. The objective of this project was to make a low emission, 4-storey townhouse that would not rely on air conditioning. Instead. good natural ventilation was established within a high-density environment. Were the renewal of the old city to progress in accordance with this model, our research shows that it …

Significance of the debate over Zaha Hadid’s New National Stadium in Tokyo

Zaha Hadid’s New National Stadium in Tokyo had immense significance for the architectural discourse. It was supposed to be completed by 2018 before the Rubgy World Cup. The huge 80,000 seater winning stadium proposal caused controversy right after its announcement. Leading Japanese architects such as Fumihiko Maki, Kengo Kuma, Toyo Ito , Sou Fujimoto voiced their discontent with the new proposal. Sou Fujimoto told the Architects’ Journal that the campaign was set up because Zaha Hadid’s building will be “too big” in relation to its surroundings, which include Kenzo Tange’s iconic 1964 Olympic stadium. [1]Arata Isozaki, another respected Japanese architect, in a lengthy statement to the media last year likened the proposal to “a dull, slow form, like a turtle waiting for Japan to sink so that it can swim away”. [2]Fumihiko  Maki organized a symposium including architect Toyo Ito, Sou Fujimoto, Kengo Kuma protesting the giant stadium. The expenditure estimates spiraled to almost double from initial estimates of £672 million (130 billion yen) to £1.3 billion (252 billion yen).[2]Under this growing controversy Shinzo Abe, …

Construction Project Management by Clough and Sears

For more than thirty years, “Construction Project Management” by Clough and Sears has been considered the preeminent guide to the Critical Path Method (CPM) of project scheduling. It combines a solid foundation in the principles and fundamentals of CPM with particular emphasis on project planning, demonstrated through an example project.This Sixth Edition features a range of improvements. New pedagogical devices improve absorption of the material. Updated labor, material, and equipment pricing is incorporated into the text. Coverage is enhanced by discussions of contemporary planning and management methods such as Work Breakdown Structures (WBS) and the Earned Value Management System (EVMS). A highway bridge with a complete cost estimate, including SI units, illustrates each of the principles of project management. Using this basic information and the case studies in the appendix, readers are given project management problems and hands-on project management experience. Also new to this edition is information on the Earned Value Analysis (EVA) system and introductory coverage of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Lean Construction in the context of project scheduling. Readers will also …

Richard Meier

If it is true that Ludwig Mies van der Rohe once said, “God is in the details,” it might be possible to say of Richard Meier’s architecture that God is in the numbers. More than any other contemporary architect, Meier has imposed a style that is almost invariably driven by grids and precisely calculated proportions. Nor are these arithmetical elements the only predictable components of his designs. And yet his work is far from being as sterile as its rigorous white demeanor might imply. Rarely completely open, Meier’s buildings are usually a symphonic arrangement of geometric volumes composed of solids, voids, and generous glazing alternating with closed surfaces. Closed on the entry side, open to the ocean or the landscape, separating private and public spaces, double height and more where the design allows, or rather imposes, Meier’s houses announce but do not summarize his approach to larger buildings. Smooth glazed or white enameled panels alternate, too, with louvered, articulated façades, not according to the architect’s whim, but rather in function to the program and the …

Architecture of First Societies

Architecture of First Societies does more than just present the architecture of first societies. The author includes information on the environment, society and cultures that influenced the resulting architecture of those first societies. In addition to being useful for presenting the motivation of these examples of early architecture, the presentation, which includes, way of life, frequently depicted with color photographs of people who carry on some of these ways of life today, color photographs of modern day versions of the architecture, color photographs of archeological diggings of historic architecture and, finally, color photographs of the environment that the various peoples lived in with notes on climate changes that have occurred since then. Finally, the presentation includes architectural drawings, especially overhead drawings of the layout of whole villages and houses. For me, this had the effect of placing me in the context of what the author was describing. The only drawback was that, due to a large amount of extra material, there were not as many architectural drawings as I might have liked. For example, it …

India’s Design Guru

Originally posted on Design thoughts:
MP Ranjan, the iconic design teacher, blogger, and a true-blue, friend, philosopher and guide, passed away this morning. What a huge loss for the Design community. He was the ultimate patron and believer in the power of design. Personally, he introduced me to precision drawing, wearing bright red shirts, reading on design, respecting the individual, educating on design and blogging on design. Pic Courtesy: DFC India Every conversation, one had with him, left you inspired and richer with knowledge. He believed in communication. During a conversation at NID, he told me, ” You write, well. You should keep at it.” I owe my design writing to him. When he knew I had an exhibition at the India Habitat Centre, in 2002, of my work done in Nagaland, he made it a point to come and see it. He was not one to wait for personal invitations. He shot copious pictures of the show, in his newly acquired digital camera. While he was doing so, he lamented the lack of design…

CROSS PURPOSE

Small in scale but large in impact, these crosses speak through objects, colors, symbols, and patterns, all juxtaposed to deeply touch the innermost being.                                                                                                                 -—Diane Kirkpatrick CROSS PURPOSE Preface by Cathy Cash Spellman, foreword by Diane Kirkpatrick, essay by Charles A. Riley II Bespoke jewelry designer and artist Adria de Haume fashioned her first cross sculpture in 1982 to encourage the recovery of a critically ill friend. She has since harnessed the power of the cruciform to create a splendid array of personal, intricate, and truly meaningful cross-centric pieces. For three decades, de Haume’s sculptures have inspired, comforted, and delighted viewers and collectors. Cross Purpose is an exquisitely striking homage to this dominant and revered art form, illustrating the range …